Creating Time In Your Day

Relax


Most people with families, careers, hobbies and other obligations wish there were just a few more hours in the day. A busy lifestyle leaves you running from place to place, always running late. It’s hard to keep up with so many obligations and you can start to feel overwhelmed and stressed.

Long-term stress like this can create negative responses in the body leading to cardiovascular diseases, metabolic issues and even cognitive problems. Stress is a major risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Research concludes that our ability to make decisions is also widely affected by stress. Long-term stress makes us switch from a flexible decision making process to one that’s more rigid and inflexible.

Running the rat race is a dominant source of stress for many people. In order to avoid more stress, you can manage your time better. In turn, you’ll be taking care of your brain health.

How?

  1. Make your daily schedule visually available to yourself. Either write everything down or use a digital calendar.
  2. Schedule 5 minute mini-breaks during the day. Do it whenever it fits in your calendar. During this time, try some deep breathing, meditation or stretching.
  3. Have an extra activity scheduled? Set an alarm or even a kitchen timer to go off 15 minutes before you need to leave. Try to leave immediately after the alarm goes off. It’s better to be a little early than a little late.
  4. Schedule some relaxation time. Take a bath, get a massage, read a book, garden, enjoy art or music or go for a walk. Do the thing that makes you relaxed that you never get to do.

References

  • Morgado, P., & Cerqueira, J. J. (2018). Editorial: The Impact of Stress on Cognition and Motivation. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 12, 326.